Posts Tagged With: Oli

A to Z: I is for iHRIS

  • iHRIS – see all related posts here.

There are many reasons I went to Malawi, back in October 2012. As I discovered after arriving, iHRIS was probably the biggest reason of them all.

It is the system (and project of the same name) commissioned by the Ministry of Health, to be their new human resources management information system: a database of their healthworkers. VSO were engaged to support its implementation and with funding from THET, recruited 6 British volunteers to help that process.

iHRIS logo

iHRIS logo

iHRIS itself is a piece of free, open source software, described as a “Health Workforce Information Solution“. It has been implemented in 15 countries to date and described by the WHO (World Health Organisation) in more detail here:-

WHO logo

WHO

WHO Global Health Workforce Alliance logo

WHO Global Health Workforce Alliance

 

Many developing countries face daunting obstacles to meeting the health care needs of their people. To ensure that the right health care provider is in the right place with the right skills, countries require current, accurate data on human resources for health (HRH). A strong human resources information system (HRIS) enables health care leaders to quickly answer the key policy and management questions affecting health care service delivery.

The iHRIS Suite Open Source HRIS software supplies health sector leaders with the information they need to track, manage, and plan the health workforce, assess HR problems, plan effective interventions, and evaluate those interventions. Both the software and a program of technical assistance are provided as well as expertise to ensure that the technology is transferred effectively and serves the ability of decision-makers to use data to lead and manage. While the iHRIS Suite was designed with the health workforce in mind, it also can be adapted for other types of workforces or organizations. Some relatively advanced computer and quantitative skills are needed to use this software.

Because the software is open source, it can be downloaded for free and customized for local needs. Each product addresses a specific health workforce leadership issue:

  • iHRIS Qualify tracks health worker training, certification, and licensure
  • iHRIS Manage maintains personnel deployment, performance, and attrition information
  • iHRIS Plan models long-term health workforce needs

.

In Malawi, we were implementing the iHRIS Manage solution because personnel related issues were the most important business problem we were trying to solve. For example, “ghost workers” and the exact planned deployment (i.e. how many doctors, nurses and midwives should be working at each healthcare facility) versus actual deployment (i.e. how many are in reality working at each clinic, hospital etc.).

Regular and critical business processes which we take for granted, like payroll, are not reliable in a country like Malawi. This made collecting and organising data for almost 30,000 employees very difficult. We spent a huge amount of effort to locate a good data source and then developing a way to import it automatically, and in the process, transforming it into a more usable structure in the iHRIS database. From Microsoft SQL Server to MySQL, for those familiar with databases.

This may sound like a fairly simple process. Technically, many would probably say it is. What it meant was, we could produce reports such as how many of each of the 300 job titles were supposed to be deployed at each “cost centre”, district or region.

After some data standardisation, we could also report on some fundamental information like how many “physicians” the Ministry really employed. For this, we had to define cadre groups, by adopting the WHO Health Workforce: Aggregated Data definitions, to make sense of the numerous job titles we had in our data source. Several of which included typos, spelling errors and duplication.

Ministry of Health Employees by Cadre

Ministry of Health Employees by Cadre

In many countries, Nurses and Midwives are two separate jobs but they are combined in Malawi, in the form of a Nurse and Midwife Technician (NMT). An NMT is the entry-level job for that professional career path and who many of my fellow VSO volunteers worked to help train more of, to cope with the ever growing population.

We also found out that there were more drivers than actual vehicles! That might sound astounding at first. But many “drivers” were, in fact, casual workers who also did other jobs. Gardening, cleaning, delivering documents from room to room etc. We still had an internal paper-based memo system and runners shuttling from office to office!

Ok, infomercial over… I really do look back at my time on the iHRIS Malawi project with fondness and a sense of achievement.

There are so many funny stories and anecdotes, which will be a source of amusement (and bemusement) for the rest of my career and especially at Team iHRIS reunions! Including spending a whole week and more trying to track down the seemingly only Internet domain registrar in Malawi. After many attempts, we eventually managed to get our server online at ihris.health.gov.mw… which came after much running around to get an IP address!

Some of my colleagues are still in Malawi, training more and more HR Officers to use the system, which is arguably the crucial step and also the original brief for which we were all recruited. To my personal regret, I’m not there to help Jim, Robin and Judy any more. Although Judy still tries to get Oli and I to troubleshoot, just like this week 😉

And our response is the same as we were still there: We’ll do what we can.

Funnily enough, I began writing this blog post because I started to look into the current issue and discovered that our system is offline. The server is most probably down because there’s another power cut at our datacentre. Sorry Judes!

(Some of) the iHRIS Malawi team

(Some of) the iHRIS Malawi team

iHRIS Malawi login page

iHRIS Malawi login page

Categories: Healthcare, Malawi, Technology, Volunteering, VSO, Work | Tags: , , , , , | 4 Comments

iHRIS Developer Training

This is slightly old news now.  It actually happened before we went live, back in January. So much has happened recently, you’ll be reading quite a few catch-up posts soon!

See my colleague Oli’s blog post about the iHRIS Developer Training Course he organised for our Malawian counterparts, which went very well. The challenge now is keeping that momentum going until all the requirements have been fulfilled and we finally start the national roll-out, which is still being planned.

PS. There was a photo competition ran by the VSO Malawi Country Office. My photo of Oli and Teddy installing our shiny new server at CHSU came second. Behind the winner, my good friend David Atherton! See this Facebook post for details. To be honest, I reckon Oli, who is a keen photographer, could have given David a run for his money… But he didn’t enter any of his photos!
Oli's developer training course

Oli’s developer training course

Learner developers x 3

Learner developers x 3

Categories: Malawi, Technology, Volunteering, VSO, Work | Tags: , | 2 Comments

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